Joe's skills for trade

For those who are willing to help others.
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This is for those who don't mind doing something a little extra for others, using their core expertise, so the other guy can get on with his project in his own field. Barter is encouraged, if it's for money that's fine too, however.

Joe's skills for trade

Postby Joe Jarski » Fri Sep 17, 2010 1:42 am

Some of my better skills that I'm willing to swap for somethin' or another...

Machining:
I have a pretty well equipped (manual) machine shop and routinely do things within a .001" down to a few "tenths".

Bridgeport Mill
Bridgeport/Romi lathe
South Bend Lathe
Reid Surface Grinder
Brown & Sharpe Universal Grinder
My prized possession - A Moore rotary table (accurate to 2 arcseconds)
And of course, saws and other miscellaneous stuff.

Welding:
Miller Dynasty 300DX TIG (GTAW) Welder
Oxy-fuel welding on steel and aluminum when the situation requires it.
I also have a MIG welder, but prefer TIG welding.

Casting:
Sand castings - up to about 20 lbs of aluminum, I can also do bronze & other materials
Investment castings - I'm just getting started, but will update as my experience advances
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Joe Jarski
 
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Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby johnf » Fri Sep 17, 2010 2:38 am

Joe
Nice Tools
I also have a Bridgeport mill 2J2 head and Colchester chipmaster lathe
Welding gear consists of homemade TIG out of a beast of a 500amp arc welder is now DC and HF start, also Selco 150amp caddy TIG/Stick, BOC 180amp MIG, power hacksaw, and a bathtub full of handtools
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Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby Doug Coulter » Fri Sep 17, 2010 9:22 am

Joe, I used a much worse rotary table to get the holes in my grid endcaps, you're going to find yours useful indeed.

This is making me real happy -- we're getting guys who DO things -- implying they know the difference between "conceptually trivial" and the real world.
Comments from people like this are worth far more than gassing by someone who has never had to make something "conceptually trivial" into reality, and frankly even a wild theory from this type of person is worth a lot more than from someone who doesn't understand the difference.

For example:
To make a fusor, you put a grid with negative HV on it into a grounded shell with a controlled atmosphere at low pressure.

Easy to say....even conceptually trivial ;) But! Practice is another entire world. Going on about how to tweak something you've never made and don't know the issues with is worthless compared to comment from someone who has been there and done that.


Edit::

You are going to find out that a decent shop such as you have saves you one metric cubic crapload of money in the vacuum business. Mine (which is similar) has paid for itself several times over in being able to fab special pieces (or even just flanges and easy stuff) rather than pay the "long buck" at "fiscally clueless physicist" prices. Not to mention time saved, and heck, it's just fun!
Posting as just me, not as the forum owner. Everything I say is "in my opinion" and YMMV -- which should go for everyone without saying.
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Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby Joe Jarski » Fri Sep 17, 2010 11:57 pm

It's funny that you should mention the flanges. My rotary table has been getting a serious workout over the past few weeks making the flanges for my new PVD chamber. Besides the obvious hole patterns, a couple of the flanges are bigger that I can swing on my lathe, so I've been spinning them on the rotary table instead.

These are a few pictures of my shop - it's kind of mess right now and I feel like I'm about knee deep in aluminum and stainless steel chips!
Shop1.JPG

Shop2.JPG
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Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby Doug Coulter » Sat Sep 18, 2010 7:30 pm

Nice. Actually, it's embarrassingly clean compared to mine right now, where I am literally knee deep in lathe swarf, and just general clutter. I find some "creative chaos" to be a good thing, but lately it's just plain chaos....gotta go clean up so I can put some pix up myself that won't make everyone gag. I mean, in yours, you can actually see the floor in places!
Posting as just me, not as the forum owner. Everything I say is "in my opinion" and YMMV -- which should go for everyone without saying.
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Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby johnf » Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:42 am

Doug
don't feel embarrised
My small shop 24'x 72' is full of crap with narrow walkways
I'm working on making space for the fusor effort
ie 4 stirling cryo generators down to 2 (to be scrapped)and the 2 RF welders turned into scrap (one done already)
1 power hacksaw (out of two) to be sold
and an old mig to be scrapped as well
along with a whole bunch of bits scavanged that I will never use

will post a pic for you all to laugh soon
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Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby Joe Jarski » Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:11 am

Every now and then I'm forced to clean up, usually when it takes me about 3 times longer to find a tool than to do the job. Which wasn't so long ago, hence the relatively clean shop. Well, that and the best angle to take the pictures from.
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Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby johnf » Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:15 am

Messatorium.jpg
Ok
hears a pic

I was going to show the 8"CF hardware but I've been burgled and some scroat has taken it all 200lbs of it
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Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby Doug Coulter » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:34 am

OK, I'll bite. Here's some of my place (one of 4 buildings, all small ones).
This is what I see coming down the stairs to work.
ShopLeft.jpg
Coming downstairs to "work".

Unless I look in the other direction:
ShopRight.jpg
Right side of shop


These leave off a couple machines and a ton of junk under the stairs....and so are flattering, kind of.

Here's the upstairs:
UpLeft.jpg
View from my bed/kitchen area


And the other side:
UpRight.jpg
Rightside up


Downstairs is where we do the big stuff, and the main fusor is in the middle of the room.
Upstairs is for the "tinker" kinds of things. On the left is my primary electronics bench, and that black box on top of the small enviornment chamber I built is a heat treat oven.
On the other side is fusor 2, a super computer (Tesla, 1k cores), the electroplating line, and in the back the chemistry bench.

My wife doesn't complain about this (!), but then I do all the cooking, nearly all the cleaning, and of course pay for it all, while she watches TV mostly, when not out finding things to recycle for money. The couch in the upstairs pix is where I'm sitting while I type. I trade the stock markets all day every day -- you have to be "on it" these days to make money and not get killed at the game. This is a reason I post so much -- it's a boring job most of the time and here I am in front of a nice computer...

I have another building (trailer) full of computers where we used to do our consulting business. Now it's mostly just storage and a big reloading setup (I am a competitive shooter).
My wife gets her own small place to make her mess in, and there's a pure-storage building as well for less used stuff.

Sad to hear you were burgled, John. Way out here in the boonies, it can be an issue (about 4 vehicles a day on this road, they get time to work without being observed) -- thieves move here as it's fairly lawless, but usually ply their trade in richer areas and come back here to hide and hang out. In this case, I kinda know who they all are (they having tried to use me as a fence, which I refuse to do) and I make sure to do two things:

Offer them paying work -- there's always something needed done around a large chunk of land like this, and
Show them how well (and fast) I shoot. I put on a pretty good demo now and then.

The combination makes me pretty theft resistant, so far. I mean even thieves have a little sense! After seeing 10 rounds of .45 go into a 1" hole at 15 paces in under 3 seconds, who would risk it?
Posting as just me, not as the forum owner. Everything I say is "in my opinion" and YMMV -- which should go for everyone without saying.
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Re: Joe's skills for trade

Postby Joe Jarski » Mon Sep 20, 2010 9:53 pm

OK, I guess I don't feel quite as bad now about my mess, except, apparently I don't have enough stuff. :cry:

Doug, you're a little quicker with a .45 than I am... OK a lot quicker, what kind of competitive shooting do you do? IDPA? ISPC? Or is it something with a long gun?

Sorry to hear about the burgling John. I'm out in the country somewhat myself, not like Doug, but I can hear a good portion of my neighbors out shooting on a regular basis, so it's kind of a low crime area.
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